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Toms headaches

(Member)
From: Northbridge
30 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
Has anyone been diagnosed with CH and CPH?
CPH has shorter and more frequent attacks and is responsive to Indomethacin.
Although I have read that Indomethacin has helped other CH patients.
Thanks
Martine.
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wayne mc

(Member)
From: marulan
71 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
what is CPH

Wayne
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Toms headaches

(Member)
From: Northbridge
30 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
Toms headaches said:
"Has anyone been diagnosed with CH and CPH?
CPH has shorter and more frequent attacks and is responsive to Indomethacin.
Although I have read that Indomethacin has helped other CH patients.
Thanks
Martine."


Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH) is also known as Sjaastad syndrome
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Barry T Coles

(Member)
From: Karratha
217 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
Here's a link to CPH; it's informative & I can see how dificult it would be to separate the 2 conditions, the symptoms are so similar.
Cheers
Barry

http://www.healthline.com/galecontent/paroxysmal-hemicraniaThis post was edited on 17/08/2010 at 9:31 am
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Shell

(Member)
From: Echuca
123 total posts
Currently suffering :(
I found this information at :
http://www.americanheadachesociety.org/assets/Grosberg.pdf

ABSTRACT:

The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) include cluster headache, the paroxysmal hemicranias and short-lasting neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT). Each of these disorders occurs in an episodic and chronic form. All of them have in common the occurrence of unilateral pain in the distribution of the first division of the trigeminal nerve and ipsilateral autonomic features.
short-lasting neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT) syndrome.

The differences between cluster headache and the other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias are the duration and frequency of daily attacks and their responses to particular treatments. Cluster headache typically lasts from 15 to 180 minutes and occurs one to eight times daily; the paroxysmal hemicranias are brief (2 to 45 minutes), but occur more frequently (one to 40 attacks daily). Cluster headache
occurs more frequently in men, while episodic paroxysmal hemicrania usually affects women.

The other main factor concerned with differences between the two are the pain levels, the paroxysmal hemicranias are considered moderate to severe pain where as cluster headache's are considered severe to excrutiating / intolerable.

Regards Shellicon
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Toms headaches

(Member)
From: Northbridge
30 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
shell said:
"I found this information at :
http://www.americanheadachesociety.org/assets/Grosberg.pdf

ABSTRACT:

The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) include cluster headache, the paroxysmal hemicranias and short-lasting neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT). Each of these disorders occurs in an episodic and chronic form. All of them have in common the occurrence of unilateral pain in the distribution of the first division of the trigeminal nerve and ipsilateral autonomic features.
short-lasting neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT) syndrome.

The differences between cluster headache and the other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias are the duration and frequency of daily attacks and their responses to particular treatments. Cluster headache typically lasts from 15 to 180 minutes and occurs one to eight times daily; the paroxysmal hemicranias are brief (2 to 45 minutes), but occur more frequently (one to 40 attacks daily). Cluster headache
occurs more frequently in men, while episodic paroxysmal hemicrania usually affects women.

The other main factor concerned with differences between the two are the pain levels, the paroxysmal hemicranias are considered moderate to severe pain where as cluster headache's are considered severe to excrutiating / intolerable.

Regards Shellicon"


Thanks for this info. I was aware of the differences.The neuro is still placing Tom in the CH category as the pain is so severe. I took a video to give the doctors an idea of the pain Tom is in. He has 1-5 attacks in 24 hours, lasting from 15-40 minutes.
Best wishes,
Martine
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wayne mc

(Member)
From: marulan
71 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
Thanks People

I am now a bit wiser, but I still have CH

Thanks Wayne
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Karmadog

(Member)
From: Canberra
13 total posts
Currently suffering :(
Hi Martine,
The differential diagnosis that we are currently undergoing with Jack is between CH and Paroxysmal Hemicrania, not chronic though. According to Dr Goadsby, PH does not respond to O2 which is the easiest and safest way to make the distinction between the two. Though of course not all CH sufferers respond to O2 either. Unfortunately the meds for one can impact negatively on the other, so it's important to try and get the correct diagnosis before attempting any prophylactic treatment.
Hope this helps
Al ;^)
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