Sign in

Seasonal Triggers

Home  >  Forums  >  Questions and Support  >  Seasonal Triggers

CharlieN

(Member)
From:
6 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
I've noticed over the years that what I now know to be clusters have coincided with the transitional seasons; spring & autumn. This effect was most pronounced in the UK where autumn & spring tend to bring rather changeable weather. Indeed, my current cluster announced itself with the abrupt start to summer temperatures (the first heatwave of Spring here in SE QLD.)

Have any other acute/periodic sufferers noticed a similar correlation?
0 people like this

wrighty

(Member)
From: Ingleside
15 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
Yes over my 13 years of suffering 90% of mine start in summer.
Regards
Wrighty
1 person likes this

Ex-member

(deleted-member)
From: unknown
42 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
BUMP (Bring Up My Posts): http://www.clusterheadaches.com.au/forum_posts.php?id=2554This post was edited on 01/02/2013 at 8:57 pm
0 people like this

jasonbloom

(Member)
From:
8 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
Cluster headaches are a series of relatively short but extremely painful headaches every day for weeks or months at a time. You tend to get them at the same time each year, such as the spring or fall. Because of their seasonal nature, people often mistake cluster headaches for symptoms of allergies or business stress.
1 person likes this

georgew

(Member)
From:
6 total posts
Not currently suffering :D
The most common allergens are pollens from wind-pollinated plants, such as trees, grasses, and weeds. The pollen from insect-pollinated plants are too heavy to remain airborne for long, and they're less likely to trigger an allergic reaction. Hay fever comes by its name from the hay-cutting season.
0 people like this

Please sign in to leave replies

An ad to help cover the costs of keeping this site up: